Eyemouth Disaster

Despite the warnings, despite the storm, they rolled out to sea from Eyemouth on that fateful day of October 1881.

For weeks, they had been unable to sail because of prevailing weather.

They were not greedy. It was their livelihood. They just wanted to earn enough to feed their families. 45 boats left harbour; only 26 returned. 189 men perished. 93 women were widowed. 267 children lost their fathers.

Two days later, out of the sea mist, Ariel Gazelle returned with all her crew. Out of the darkness of tragedy, shone a shaft of light and life.

Ariel-Gazelle

Ariel Gazelle. Photo courtesy of Eyemouth Museum.


This is my submission for the
Flash Fiction Challenge in the Carrot Ranch Literary Community on 31st January 2019.
The prompt is ‘Sea Mist’ – 99 words exactly.

Sea Mist

George C. Bailey Photography 2019


Footnote (4th February)

I am grateful to David Dougal of Eyemouth for subsequently sending this article to me.

Ariel Gazelle article


 

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About Lance Greenfield

Blog: lancegreenfield.wordpress.com email: lancegmitchell@outlook.com I published my debut novel in December 2014: Eleven Miles. My second novel went live in February 2016: Knitting Can Walk!
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8 Responses to Eyemouth Disaster

    • Glad you liked it. I only just bashed this out when a writer friend showed me her entry to this challenge. That inspired me to write one of my own. Although the disaster occurred many years before we were even born, the children of Eyemouth felt the grief. It was engraved on our hearts. Family lines continued, so our classmates shared names with those who were taken by the sea.

      Liked by 1 person

  1. A sad history, that. Every fishing village has a story or two, but that’s a big one, a huge loss.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Charli Mills says:

    Great story, Lance! I got chills when you revealed the unexpected return of the Ariel Gazelle. Thanks for the history!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: Sea Mist « Carrot Ranch Literary Community

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